Novel Corona virus (Covid – 19)

How the coronavirus spreads and how to protect yourself

  • The virus spreads in a similar way to flu or the common cold, in large droplets produced by coughs and sneezes. Germs can live on surfaces for several hours.
  • Public Health England defines having close contact with a virus carrier as being within two metres of the person for 15 minutes.
  • For people who might have coronavirus, health officials are urging a “catch it, bin it, kill it” approach. In short, this means means catching sneezes and coughs in tissues, throwing them away, and then washing your hands.
  • Regular hand washing is considered the most important precaution to reduce the chances of contamination from the virus lingering on surfaces.

Where is the disease now?


As well as being reported in China, the disease is now in more than 80 countries around the world, including popular south-east Asian holiday destinations such as Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia.

Italy has also seen a large number of cases, leading the authorities to impose a lock down in the north of the country.

The disease has also spread to the Middle East, with Iran particularly affected.

Holi festival in Nepal

‘Holi’ festival of colors known as Fagupurnima [‘Fagu’ is a month called Falgun on Nepali calendar and ‘Purnima’ is full Moon day from lunar calendar]. It is one of the most beautiful festivals among the numerous festivals celebrated in Hindu culture. It is happiness festival celebrating on the victory of God over evil. It is mainly celebrated in the month of late March. In this festival, people dance, play with different types of colors, singing folk songs with festive joys. During this festival family members, friends, neighbors gather together and play Holi. It is also an outburst of youthful excitement throwing colors and lolas (water filled balloons) to each other.

During the festival, people can be seen going around on the street either on foot or on some vehicles, with a variety of colors smeared over their face and body. We celebrate this festival all over the country. Geographically, celebrate the festival for two days, the first day for high hill and mid-hill areas and the second day at low lands called at the Terai. The tourists also enjoy the festival with full of cheering at tourism areas such as Thamel, Kathmandu Durbar square at Kathmandu, lakeside at Pokhara. It also helps in the promotion of tourism in Nepal. The numbers of tourists are repeating to visit Nepal time and again according to the calendar.

There is a traditional belief behind the celebration of Holi festival. ‘Holi’ comes from the name of a mythical demon, Holika. Since Holika and Hiranyakasyapu were sister and brother. Pralhad was the son of Hiranyakasyapu, he was a strong devotee of Lord Vishnu. The demon King Hiranakasyapu planned the death of his son by putting him into a burning fire on his sister Holika’s lap. She was blessed as fire protection from Lord Bramha. Brahmas’s blessing could not work as it was not used for good purpose. Therefore, Holika was burnt in the fire whereas Pralhad was saved by the grace of God Vishnu. Thus Holi is also celebrated to rejoice Holika’s death.

Also, we have another traditional story, from the Puranas and Bhagawat Gita (The Holy books of Hinduism), Kansha sent a female demon named Putana to kill his nephew Lord Krishna. Putana takes the form of nurse and went to Brindaban to kill Lord Krishna. Since Lord Krishna was a small child and she tried to kill him by breastfeeding with her poisonous milk. But the attempt backfired and she was killed. Her body burnt on the night of Holi. So, it is also considered as the festival of fire. The moral of this festival is ‘if you use the power for a positive purpose is always bears good result but not for the negative.’

Holi is the time for fun and joyful also frolic for everyone.

Annapurna Trekking in Nepal

The word Annapurna is a Sanskrit word. It has two words Anna + Purna separately. Where “Anna” stands for GRAIN and “Purna” stands for FULL, thus the meaning for the word is “Full OF GRAINS” in common Nepali language. The word Annapurna is also popular as “GODDESS OF THE HARVEST” in Nepal.

Annapurna Trek is one of the most famous and popular trekking routes in the central-north part of Nepal. This trek is still considered as one of the best trekking routes in Nepal, even though constructions are going on.

Sight-Seeing and Trip Challenges

7 to 21 days long, Annapurna trek takes you through distinct regional scenery of rivers, flora, fauna and above all – mountains. The trek is demanding for those who want to face new challenges. And the challenging trip is every bit worthy of the scenery you will witness. Eagle Treks and Expedition and its guides will make this trek easier and memorable for your lifetime.

Weather in the Annapurna Region

The Annapurna Trek is filled with the aura and energy of the trekkers. The lower region of Annapurna is generally warm. The temperature starts to decrease once we start getting high up to the mountains. The higher region has a temperature just like any other mountain regions. But unlike other mountain regions, the Annapurna Trek is believed to visitable all round the year.

TREK WITH EAGLE

Annapurna Trek in Nepal goes counter-clockwise from Besisahar to Nayapul. It reaches its summit in Throng-La (pass) at the height of 5416m, or 17,769 feet. The route goes past the following mountains: Manaslu (an 8,000-plus meter peak), Langtang Himal, Annapurna II and IV, Annapurna III and Gangapurna, and, of course, Annapurna I and Dhaulagiri — passing through the world’s deepest gorge in between those two 8,000-plus meter peaks.

Annapurna Trekking Itinerary

The Famous

Poon Hill, at the end of the trek, affords views of two +8000 m high mountains South Annapurna and Dhaulagiri. The Fishtail Mountain is only 6993 m but looks like taller than those two can be seen from the same point. Annapurna trek also goes through Buddhist villages and Hindu holy sites, most notably the village of Muktinath. It is a holy site for both Buddhists and Hindus, and Braga, one of the oldest monasteries in the region.

All about The East

The eastern portion of the trek follows the Marsyangdi River upstream, to its source near the village of Manang. To get there several days of up-hill hiking are required. Then the route goes over the pass, a grueling day of hiking, and back down to the other side. There it meets up with the Kali Gandaki River.

TRIP INFORMATION

We will have the privilege of passing through five of the most popular districts in the country on the trek; Kaski (known for its numerous amount of lakes), Manang (known for its famous Tilicho lake), Mustang (known for its adventurous trekking and beautiful natural scenery), Myagdi, and Lamjung.

Lamjung, Myagdi, and Kaski of the lower elevations are both predominantly Hindu and with lush green subtropical valleys with villages and terraced farming. Trekking through such an environment will leave you feeling blessed when you breathe in such a fresh year. Manang and Mustang districts are of the higher elevations and are predominantly Tibetan Buddhists.

Village Settlements and Culture

The Manang people are Gurung (not Tibetan descent). They are very proud of their unique cultural heritage and merging of lower land Gurung and Tibetan cultural influences. People of Mustang identify themselves a lot closer to Tibet.

The Mustang region has actually been part of Tibet in history. Mustang also is one of the last places in the world that boasts the view of ancient Bonpo Religion in action. Villages to note for Bonpo are Thini and Lupra near Jomsom, and Nargon near Kobang.

We can also address the Annapurna Trek in Nepal as “teahouse trek” (lodge to lodge). Most of the villages have modern lodges with restaurants for lodging and foods along the entire route. You are expected for breakfast and dinner in the same lodge where you are spending the night.

The Annapurna Conservation Area Permit (ACAP; permit) and the Trekkers’ Information Management System (TIMS) is compulsory to visit the Annapurna region.

Annapurna Trek in Nepal

The word Annapurna is a Sanskrit word. It has two words Anna + Purna seperately. Where “Anna” stands for GRAIN and “Purna” stands for FULL, thus the meaning for the word is “Full OF GRAINS” in common Nepali language. This is also popular as “GODDESS OF THE HARVEST” in Nepal. The Annapurna Trek is one of the famous and popular trekking routes lies on the central-north part of Nepal. This trekking region is considered one of the best treks in the world, though road construction is threatening its reputation and its future as a classic trek. Yet no one disputes that the scenery is outstanding: 17 to 21 days long, this trek takes you through distinct regional scenery of rivers, flora, fauna and above all – mountains.

Trek with Eagle!Annapurna Trekking Itinerary

Eagle Treks and Expedition and its guide make this trek easier and memorable for your life time. There are five districts that are passed through on the trek; Lamjung, Manang, Mustang, Myagdi and Kaski. Lamjung, Myagdi and Kaski of the lower elevations are both predominantly Hindu and with lush green subtropical valleys with villages and terraced farming.
Manang and Mustang districts are of the higher elevations and are predominantly Tibetan Buddhist. The Manang people are Gurung (not Tibetan descent) and are very proud of their unique cultural heritage and merging of lower land Gurung and Tibetan cultural influences. People of Mustang identify themselves a lot closer with Tibet and the Mustang region has actually been part of Tibet in history. Mustang also is one of the last places in the world to view the ancient Bonpo Religion in action. Villages to note for Bonpo are Thini and Lupra near Jomsom, and Nargon near Kobang.
Annapurna trek goes counter-clockwise from Besisahar to Nayapul and reaches its summit in Throng-La (pass) at the height of 5416m, or 17,769 feet. The route goes past the following mountains: Manaslu (an 8,000-plus meter peak), Langtang Himal, Annapurna II and IV, Annapurna III and Gangapurna, and, of course, Annapurna I and Dhaulagiri — passing through the world’s deepest gorge in between those two 8,000-plus meter peaks. Poon Hill, at the end of the trek, affords views of those two mountains, as well as South Annapurna and Machhapuchhre, the “Fishtail Mountain.”
The trek also goes through Buddhist villages and Hindu holy sites, most notably the village of Muktinath, a holy site for both Buddhists and Hindus, and Braga, one of the oldest monasteries in the region.
The eastern portion of the trek follows the Marsyangdi River upstream, to its source near the village of Manang. To get there several days of up-hill hiking are required. Then the route goes over the pass, a grueling day of hiking, and back down the other side, where it meets up with the Kali Gandaki River. At the end of the trek, several options are available: following the river further to the road proper to Beni and catching a bus to Pokhara, or adding on a trek to the Annapurna Base Camp (ABC Trek), it is also called the Annapurna Sanctuary Trek.
We can operate Annapurna trek as “tea-house trek,” meaning there are villages with lodges and restaurants to eat and stay in along the entire route. You are expected to eat breakfast and dinner in the same lodge where you are spending the night.

The famous and trekking routes on this Area are:

Trekking in Nepal

Trekking in Nepal with experts! Eagle Treks and Expeditions is an active and innovative agency with over a decade of experience. We offer trekking in every region of Nepal. The most popular trekking routes in Nepal are Annapurna, Everest, Langtang, Manaslu, Ganesh Himal, Dhaulagiri, hiking to Nagarkot and many more. Our well experienced trekking experts instantly design a suitable trekking itinerary for you keeping all your needs in mind. We want you to have a pleasant and memorable time trekking in Nepal Himalayas and will do what we can to help you achieve your goals. We can design both long and short treks to suit your holidays, timing and your region of interest. Do not worry if you do not have any trekking equipment, trekking information or trekking maps. We will organize all these for you. Beside these popular trails, our experts are also willing and keen to explore brand new trails with you.

Eagle Treks specializes in customer service in the Himalayan ranges fostering our motto

of Hospitality, Friendship and Flexibility with personal care of our valuable guests. We can assure you that your holiday will be adventurous, fascinating and a memorable cultural experience to your utmost satisfaction. Normally we offer three different standards of trekking in Nepal Easy, Moderate and Adventurous. We operate two different standard trekking and they are:

a) Fully organized trek (camping) and
b)  Lodge trek popularly known as Tea house trek.

Preparation

Visitors who are intending on undertaking long treks in regions such as Annapurna, Manaslu and Everest should familiarize themselves with physical demands of trekking in those locations. For example, they should ensure they have:

1) good, comfortable shoes
2) A well fitting pack (day pack or rucksack) that suits their body shape and size.
3) If you have weak knees or joints, come prepared.
4) First aid kit with blister packs
5) Ensure your travel insurance covers you for helicopter rescue
6) If your diet usually incorporates meat, bring supplements such as iron as safe meat for consumption is unlikely to be available along these trekking routes.

Great Himalayan Trail

We just finishedght_logo2 the three months long Great Himalayan Trail trekking with some Kiwis and a French girl. They started from Kanchanjunga and finish it from Simikot, Humla in 123 days although there was a big challenge to us with the bad weather. We couldn’t cross the few passes at east because of massive snowfall. Eventually, when we arrive in the Khumbu area the weather was perfect and there was no problem for the rest of the high passes.

Facebook post on July 16, 2017

For those of you not into majestic mountains, ancient villages & beautiful monasteries we also made a lot of dog friends along the Great Himalaya Trail. If we could spare a couple of biscuits we had a friend all the way to at least the next village where we met another dog. One day we had three dogs follow us for more than 5 hours down a valley until we decided that we should try to tell them to find their way home, ops.

Facebook post on July 14, 2017

The Great Himalaya Trail team walked across the remote Upper Dolpa region crossing eight 5000m+ passes on their way. At Dolpoleast the beautiful lakes, peaks, villages & monasteries helped to distract us from the constant up & down of the trail. Here We also got to witness the madness of the Yasha Gompa season that sees thousands of Nepalese go searching for the natural medicine high on the Himalayan mountain slopes. We were luckily able to eat & stay with these people in their remote makeshift tent villages where at any other time of year we would be lucky to see anyone.

Facebook post on July 4, 2017

Well, it isn’t over until the fat lady sings & according to us, the GHT isn’t finished until your sitting in a bar in Kathmandu with a cold beer!
After taking some photos at the end of the trail & celebrating with a beer we waited at the makeshift Hilsa airport for a space on one of the tour helicopters to get back to Simikot & then onto Kathmandu. After 5 hours of waiting for the last flight left without a spare seat for either of us. The next morning flights were canceled & the offer of a ‘seat’ in the back of a tip truck came up so we decided to take it & got a ride, 15km, as far as the road going towards Simikot. We then had to walk for two days, retracting our earlier steps the remaining 40km to get to a more reliable flight to Kathmandu.
Although we were physically & mentally done with the GHT we managed to get motivated by the thought of finally getting to Kathmandu for a second GHT celebratory beer.

Facebook post on July 14, 2017

Halftime Match Report – PLEASE SHARE

GHT 2017
Two nights ago we celebrated our 60th day on foot, having walked halfway across Nepal on the Great Himalaya Trail.
Our team of four, Yadab, Cécile, Andrew & myself started by climbing up to Kanchenjunga Base Camp where we were initiated into the Himalaya’s with -20 degree nights and where we were hit with a late winter snowfall. Luckily Cécile had bought her sleeping bag sized gloves! Heading west we struggled over Nango La Pass in meter deep fresh snow & were eventually stopped in our tracks at the Lumba Sumba pass due to the difficult & dangerous snow conditions. This meant that we had to make a huge detour around Makalu Region through the Himalayan foothills, through beautiful rhododendron forests, agricultural terraces & rural villages which was a nice change from the alpine environment. On our way Andrew fell, bounced over a few rocks & broke a rib. We were able to make it to the more developed Khumbu Region where Andrew got some medical attention & we meet up with my wife Jess. Here we were able to find some foods other than our twice daily Dal Bhat (Lentals & Rice) so we ate as much as we could, hoping to stop our rapid weight loss that had Yadab looking like a bearded 10-year-old boy.

In the Khumbu, we were also able to stand among the towering giants of Everest, Lhotse, Ama Dablam & Cho Oyu. We climbed the 5000m+ Kala Patthar, Cho La, Gokyo Ri & Renjo La & visited Everest Base Camp. Yadab, Jess & Cécile flew back to Kathmandu while Andrew & I crossed the difficult yet stunning Tashi Lapcha pass in very cold but clear weather. From here we traversed through hillside villages, visited monasteries & stayed in isolated hearers cottages until we arrived at The Last Resort for some much-needed comfort & a sterilizing hot shower.

Helambu Region came as a huge reality check with indistinguishable & overgrown trails, we got lost, sick & days of rain. Andrew discovered a few new choices four-letter words to describe this experience. We were already exhausted before we even reached Tilman Pass but managed one last big effort to cross just as a storm covered us in fresh snow. Despite the tough day, we woke to an amazing morning & soon made it down to civilization in the beautiful Langtang Valley where we were quick to embrace the luxuries of the touristic area. Throughout the last month, we had witnessed the devastation of the 2015 earthquake that has destroyed most of every village that we have walked through. Despite this, the people we meet were getting on with life with smiles on their faces.

In Langtang, we were rejoined by Cécile and the three of us are now headed in the direction of Khahare, our guide Yadav’s village where we are looking forward to having him rejoin the team & to meeting his family. We are currently feeling really good, despite dropping a few dress sizes, but we still have a long way to go to get to Hilsa on the Chinese border.
Throughout our trip so far we have been in awe of the amazing friendliest, hospitality & generosity of the Nepalese people. These people have been born to a much harder life than we have yet they have helped us so much along the way. This trip wouldn’t be possible without those who have opened their homes to us & who have asked their mothers to cook for us. Dhanyabad!

Dashain Festival in Nepal

During the month of late September or early October, the Nepalese people treat as the biggest festival of the year, Dashain. Dashain is the longest and the most auspicious festival in the Nepalese annual calendar, celebrated by Nepalese of all caste who believes in Hinduism throughout the country. The fifteen days of celebration occurs during the bright lunar fortnight ending on the day of the full moon. Thorough out the kingdom of Nepal the goddess Durga in all her manifestations are worshiped with numbers of pujas and thousands of animal sacrifices for the ritual holy goddess for days in blood.

The main celebration glorifies the triumph of good over evil and is symbolized by goddess Durga slaying the terrible demon Mahisasur, who terrorised the earth in the guise of a brutal water buffalo. The first nine days signify the nine days of ferrous battle between goddess Durga and the demon Mahisasur. The tenth day is the day when Mahisasur was slain and the last five days symbolise the celebration of the victory with the blessing of the goddess. Dashain is celebrated with great cheer, and goddess Durga is worshiped throughout the country as the divine mother goddess.

In preparation for Dashain every home is cleansed and beautifully decorated, painted as an invitation to the mother goddess, so that she may visit and bless the house with good fortune. All types of organisations are closed for ten to fifteen days. Labourers are almost impossible to find (including trekking guide and porters). About 76% of total population of country enjoy it on the festive mood. Anywhere you go the whiff of ‘Vijaya Dashami’ can be found.

The first nine days of Dashain are called Nawa Ratri when tantric rites are conducted. In Nepal the life force is embodied in the divine energy and power of the female, depicted as goddess Durga in her many forms.

The first day of Dashain is called Ghatasthapana, which literally means pot establishing. On this day the Kalash, (holy water vessel) symbolising goddess Durga often with her image marked on the side is placed in the prayer room. The Kalash is filled with holy water and covered with cow dung on to which seeds are sown. A small rectangular sand block is made and the Kalash is put in the center. The surrounding bed of sand is also seeded with different grains, mainly barley and maize. The ghatasthapana ritual is performed at a certain auspicious moment determined by the astrologers. At that particular moment the priest intones a welcome, requesting goddess Durga to bless the vessel with her presence.

The room where the Kalash is established is called ‘Dashain Ghar’. Generally women are not allowed to enter the room where Dashain puja is being carried out. A priest or a household man worships the Kalash everyday once in the morning and then in the evening. The Kalash and the sand are sprinkled with holy water everyday and it is shielded from direct sunlight. By the tenth day, the seed will have grown to five or six inches long yellow grass. The sacred yellow grass is called ‘Jamara’. It is bestowed by the elders atop the heads of those younger to them during the last five days when Tika is put on. The jamara is taken as a token of Goddess Durga as well as the elders blessing. As days passes by regular rituals are observed till the seventh day.

The seventh day is called ‘Fulpati’ (full of flowers and their leaf).

In fulpati, the Kkalash filled with holy water, banana stalks, jamara and sugar cane tied with red cloth is carried by Brahmans on a decorated palanquin under a gold tipped and embroidered umbrella. The government officials also join the fulpati parade. We enter this fulpati at Dashain Ghar. With this the Dashain feasting starts.

The eighth day is called the Maha Asthami:

The passion of worship and sacrifice to Durga and Kali increases. On this day many orthodox Hindus will be fasting. Sacrifices are held in almost every house through out the day. The night of the eighth day is called ‘Kal Ratri’, the dark night. Hundreds of goats, sheep and buffaloes are sacrificed at the mother goddess temples. The sacrifice continues till daylight. While the puja is being carried out great feasts are held in the homes of common people where large amount of meat will be consumed.

The ninth day is called Maha Nawami:

Temples of mother goddess are filled with people from dawn till dusk. Animals mostly black buffaloes are slaughtered to honour Durga the goddess of victory and might and to seek her blessing. On this very day the god Vishwa Karma, the God of creativity is also worshiped. All factories, vehicles, any machinery instruments and anything from which we make a living are worshiped. We also give sacrifices to all moving machinery like cars, aeroplanes, trucks etc. to get the blessing from goddess Durga for protection for vehicles and their occupants against accidents during the year. The entire day is colourful.

The tenth day is the Vijaya Dashami:

On this day we take tika and jamara from our elders and receive their blessing. We visit our elders in their home and get tika from them while our younger ones come to our home to receive blessing from us. The importance of Dasain also lies in the fact that on this day family members from far off and distant relatives come for a visit as well as to receive tika from the head of the family. This function continues for four days. After four days of rushing around and meeting your relatives Dashain ends on the full moon day, the fifteenth day. In the last day people stay at home and rest. The full moon day is also called ‘Kojagrata’ meaning ‘who is awake’. The Hindu goddess of wealth Laxmi is worshipped. On this day the goddess Laxmi is given an invitation to visit each and everyone.

After Dashain everyone settles back to normal. After receiving the blessing of goddess Durga, people are ready to work and acquire virtue, power and wealth. Dashain thus is not only the longest festival but also the most likely one among all the festivals of Nepal.

1,000 delegates expected at PATA meet in Beijing

1,000 delegates expected at PATA meet in Beijing Up to 1,000 delegates from across the world are gathering in Beijing, next week, for the PATA 60th anniversary celebrations and Annual Conference. The focal point of PATA’s year-long celebrations, it will take place at the China World Hotel from April 9-12. Of the 1,000 registered to attend, there are 460 international delegates, 540 local delegates, seven ministers, 35-diplomats and 180 media persons. Together they represent 66-countries and regions, along with more than 400-organisations, according to PATA.

The Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) commenced its Adventure Travel and Responsible Tourism Conference and Mart (AT&RTCM) event in Pokhara, in the mountain kingdom of Nepal. Under the theme ‘Social Give Back: Doing Well by Doing Good’, the conference once again addressed key issues facing responsible travel, and sought to improve awareness regarding sustainable tourism practices.

KATHMANDU, Jan 14: President Dr Ram Baran Yadav on Friday afternoon declared Nepal Tourism Year 2011 open amidst a colorful ceremony at the Dashrath Stadium.

Norvic International Hospital has set up a health clinic at Tribhuvan International Airport (TIA) targeting foreign passengers. Minister for Tourism and Civil Aviation Khadga Bahadur Bishwakarma inaugurated the clinic amid a function on June 5. The hospital opened the clinic after the government requested it to set up the clinic at the country´s only international airport. According to the hospital, all the services provided through the clinic will be free of cost. It will also provide free ambulance service to patients if needed. The hospital is deploying a doctor, a nurse and a health assistant at the post from 7 am till 11 pm.

Nepal to ban independent trekking

Travellers wishing to trek in the Nepalese Himalayas will be required to use an official guide following a series of assaults. Government officials in Nepal have announced that, from September, it will be compulsory for all tourists who want to trek in the country, to be accompanied by at least one government registered porter or guide.

Travellers wishing to trek in the Nepalese Himalayas will be required to use an official guide following a series of assaults. Government officials in Nepal have announced that, from September, it will be compulsory for all tourists who want to trek in the country, to be accompanied by at least one government registered porter or guide.

Trekkers travelling in groups are already required to do so, but previously solo adventurers were permitted to explore the mountains alone. The new rule is likely to come into force next month.

The decision was taken by the Ministry of Home Affairs and has been welcomed by the Trekking Agencies Association of Nepal (TAAN), which says it will help to ensure the safety of tourists and the control of illegal trekking businesses.

It follows the death of 23-year-old Belgian Debbie Maveau, whose decapitated body was found on June 14 beneath a hiking trail in the Langtang National Park, near the Tibetan border. This incident followed a number of other assaults and disappearances including that of an American, Aubrey Sacco, who went missing in 2010.

Mohan Lamsal, general secretary of TAAN has said, “The decision will help promote Nepal as a safe destination for tourists at a time when international media are questioning the safety of foreigners in Nepal.”

The new policy will involve an additional fee of $10 per day for Free Individual Trekkers (FIT), which Anjan Thapa, treasurer of TAAN has called, “a very nominal amount which won’t effect tourist arrivals.”

According to statistics collated by Tribhuvan International Airport, tourist arrivals in Nepal by air increased by 9.2 per cent last month, compared with July 2011. Total arrivals in the first seven months of 2012 increased by 18.5 per cent.
Source: Telegraph, UK

Ground Realities of April 25, 2015 Devastating Earthquake in Nepal

  • Out of 75 districts of Nepal, only 8 are affected.
  • Out of 10 National Parks, only 1 is affected.
  • All the highways and sub-ways are in operation with zero damage…
  • Out of 8 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, only 2 have around 40% damages
  • 90% hotels in Kathmandu Valley are safe and in operational conditions. 100% Hotels in popular destinations like Pokhara, Chitwan, Lumbini, Bardiya, Ilam, Annapurna Region, Everest Region etc. are safe and in full operation.
  • Out of 35 popular trekking routes, only 2 are affected they are Manaslu Trek and Langtang Trek
  • All the International and National airports are in operation with zero damage
  • Communication (nets, phone calls, ATMs, swipe machines) is working well.
  • Hospitals and Clinics are safe and in operation. No viral diseases or influenza is seen.
  • Hospitals and Clinics are safe and in operation. No viral diseases or influenza is seen.

Thus, Nepal is still safe destination for adventure tourism. Eagle Treks and Expedition P. Ltd. always welcome the tourist as earlier. There is no better way to revive the economy than through tourism; which succors every level of Nepali society. We will always be grateful for all your help in these difficult times, so please make a plan to come to Nepal on your next vacation and be a part of rebuilding our country. We will donate 10% of our profit on those affected areas to rebuild the school buildings on your direct supervision if you can, after completion of one year from now. Help for Nepal!

If anyone willing for volunteering in Nepal and help, please contact us we will help you and drop you where people need in deed.

Thank you in advance for your kind support.